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Rebecca Raymond '02, M.A. '03: Teacher for Life

Alumni


 

Published:

February 13, 2014
Tagged: STEP Program, Department of Sociology, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education, Honors College, College of Arts and Sciences
 

Rebecca Raymond '02, M.A. '03: Teacher for Life

Alumni


 

by Cecil Harris

“Adelphi’s appeal lies in its strong academic programs, dedicated staff and commitment to continual improvement.”–Rebecca Raymond ’02, M.A. ’03

To say that Honors College and Scholar Teacher Education Program (S.T.E.P.) graduate Rebecca Raymond ’02, M.A. ’03, is devoted to teaching would be an understatement. Her email address abbreviates the phrase “teacher for life.” A specialist in bilingual education, she earned undergraduate degrees in sociology and elementary education, a master’s degree in elementary education and a bilingual education certificate in Adelphi University’s Ruth S. Ammon School of Education. She teaches at Southampton Elementary School, where she also coordinates the dual language and ESL programs. A resident of Center Moriches, New York, she is on course to complete her doctorate in educational administration and technology at Dowling College in May 2014.

Who influenced you to become a teacher?

My mother was a teacher in her native country [El Salvador]. From early on, I was drawn to helping others. As a high school senior, I became a participant observer in a first-grade classroom. 

How did Adelphi University prepare you for what you do?

Adelphi’s appeal lies in its strong academic programs, dedicated staff and commitment to continual improvement. My course work forced me to think of instruction as preparing my students to be global citizens. My sociology classes helped to cultivate my interest in research, and the Honors College provided excellent opportunities to extend my learning outside of the classroom. 

At Adelphi, I founded STARS (Standing Together to Always Reach Students), a club for elementary and middle school students to become involved in community service. My Adelphi experiences prompted me to pursue lifelong learning. 

When did you know that you wanted to work in bilingual education?

Infusing culture into the curriculum stemmed from my own upbringing. I received much support from my professors at Adelphi when, in my senior year, I decided to study abroad in El Salvador. I took course work in sociology and volunteered at a local school. This experience solidified my desire to work in bilingual education.

What advice would you give to Adelphi students who want to do what you do?

Education is undergoing a continual change that challenges the roles of educators, administrators and school systems. The demographics of communities are changing. Students entering classrooms may not speak English as their dominant language. Therefore, it becomes necessary for the educator to view this change as an opportunity to build upon the knowledge that their students currently possess. This comes with the belief that all students bring something to their learning, as well as the classroom environment. The challenge is for the teacher to unlock this potential for learning. Never lose sight of why you chose to enter this profession.  

 
Tagged: STEP Program, Department of Sociology, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education, Honors College, College of Arts and Sciences
 
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